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Trusts: The Swiss Army Knife of Estate Planning

Trusts serve many different purposes in estate planning. They all have the intent to protect the assets placed within the trust. The type of trust determines what the protection is, and from whom it is protected, says the article “Trusts are powerful tools which can come in many forms,” from The News Enterprise. To understand how trusts protect, start with the roles involved in a trust.

The person who creates the trust is called a “grantor” or “settlor.” The individuals or organizations receiving the benefit of the property or assets in the trust are the “beneficiaries.” There are two basic types of beneficiaries: present interest beneficiaries and “future interest” beneficiaries. The beneficiary, by the way, can be the same person as the grantor, for their lifetime, or it can be other people or entities.

The person who is responsible for the property within the trust is the “trustee.” This person is responsible for caring for the assets in the trust and following the instructions of the trust. The trustee can be the same person as the grantor, as long as a successor is in place when the grantor/initial trustee dies or becomes incapacitated. However, a grantor cannot gain asset protection through a trust, where the grantor controls the trust and is the principal recipient of the trust.

One way to establish asset protection during the lifetime of the grantor is with an irrevocable trust. Someone other than the grantor must be the trustee, and the grantor should not have any control over the trust. The less power a grantor retains, the greater the asset protection.

One additional example is if a grantor seeks lifetime asset protection but also wishes to retain the right to income from the trust property and provide a protected home for an adult child upon the grantor’s death. Very specific provisions within the trust document can be drafted to accomplish this particular task.

There are many other options that can be created to accomplish the specific goals of the grantor.

Some trusts are used to protect assets from taxes, while others ensure that an individual with special needs will be able to continue to receive needs-tested government benefits and still have access to funds for costs not covered by government benefits.

An estate planning attorney will have a thorough understanding of the many different types of trusts and which one would best suit each individual situation and goal.

Reference: The News Enterprise (July 25, 2020) “Trusts are powerful tools which can come in many forms”

social security scam

A Four-Decades Long Social Security Scam Finally Ends

In one of the largest fraud cases of its kind, a 76-year-old small business owner in Oregon has been collecting his deceased aunt’s Social Security checks and even her stimulus payment from the Treasury Department issued in May, as reported by AARP in the article “Nephew Allegedly Cashed Dead Aunt’s Social Security Checks for More Than 40 Years.” The nephew, George William Doumar, also collected his own Social Security benefits, telling authorities, “it was nice to have the extra money coming in every month.”

Both Doumar and his aunt, who is not named, lived in Brooklyn. She never married and had no children. Before she died, back in 1971, she named her nephew her sole beneficiary of her life insurance policy. Until July 14, he was getting both his and his aunt’s monthly checks. When interviewed at his home by federal agents, he slumped and said, “that’s a long story … what happened was, well, she’s passed and yes, I’ve been collecting her Social Security.”

Here is what has emerged in this bizarre story:

At age 65, the aunt applied for Social Security, but her wages in 1970 made her ineligible to receive benefits. By August 1977, the Social Security Administration initiated retirement benefits, using her initial benefit application. The first retirement check went out to her in September 1977—after she’d been dead for more than six years.

She had lived in a nursing facility in Brooklyn from about 1969 until her death in 1971. Doumar also lived in Brooklyn and says he doesn’t recall how he obtained regular possession of the checks. He also said that at one point, he reported her death to the SSA, but there are no records of her death being reported.

At first, he cashed her checks at a New York business he owned, but he moved to Oregon in 1989. He forged her signature to add her name to a joint checking account he had with his wife in Oregon. The Social Security checks were mailed to the business he owned.

In February, when government staffers deemed that the aunt would have been 114 years old, they became suspicious. No updates had been made to her account in more than 30 years, except for the address change.

Doumar is facing felony charges, and authorities plan to seek restitution for the amount he stole: $460,192.30. Minus the stimulus check, that’s about $912.50 a month, for nearly 42 years.

It might have been nice to have the extra money, but not to be facing the possibility of 10 years in prison and a $25,000 fine, in addition to paying back the money owed to the Social Security Administration.

Reference: AARP (Aug. 14, 2020) “Nephew Allegedly Cashed Dead Aunt’s Social Security Checks for More Than 40 Years.”

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