Estate Planning Blog Articles

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estate planning

Cornelius Vanderbilt Created an Estate Plan, but Should I?

AJC’s recent article entitled “Why Vanderbilts should inspire you to create an estate plan” explains that when Cornelius Vanderbilt died, his son, William, inherited most of the fortune and nearly doubled it within a decade. However, after that came a drop in the cash, and after just a few decades, the fortune had been spent. Therefore, none of Vanderbilt’s descendants stayed among the wealthiest people in the country.

When 120 Vanderbilt family members recently gathered for a reunion at Vanderbilt University, not one was a millionaire. In a century, the largest estate America has ever known had dwindled to next to nothing.

Let’s look at why this happens and how you can prevent this from happening to your estate.

America is currently in the midst of the greatest transfer of wealth ever. An estimated $59 trillion will be transferred to heirs, charities and taxes between 2007 and 2061. However, roughly 70% of wealth transfers aren’t successful. This means that sometimes heirs get practically nothing. There are three reasons for this failure:

  1. No trust and communication among heirs because they’re all concerned about their share.
  2. Heirs are unprepared to inherit an estate, which may include managing investments or a business. In many cases, other family members don’t know how it works.
  3. Heirs have no clue where the money should go and what purpose it should serve because no one is thinking long term about what is best for the family assets.

It’s common for business owners to believe that an estate plan is enough to keep everything in order, but they don’t consider their business. This is the reason why succession planning is vital. This planning determines what happens to the business itself and lays out the strategy, so it continues to operate smoothly after it’s passed to the heirs.

Let’s look at some tips for dealing with estate planning that should make for a smooth transition:

Create a plan. If you die without a will, state probate law will determine who gets your assets. This may not be what you want. Talk to an experienced estate planning attorney to be certain that everything is drawn up correctly.

Discuss the issues with your heirs. Talk to your family about the financial details. Make sure that your heirs know the details of your estate, so they can start to manage and oversee it once you die.

Get heirs involved in the process. Likewise, heirs can help plan based on their knowledge, future availability and expectations. By planning now, no one will be caught unaware about what to do with the estate.

Ready your heirs. Educate your heirs on how to manage and oversee your assets, especially if you have a succession plan for a business. Discuss the company’s mission and vision, and what you want the company to achieve.

Organize your financial documents. Get all financial documents in a single location and label everything clearly to help out your heirs. Keep this in a safe location, and let your heirs know where it’s located. Your attorney should also have a copy of your will, estate plan and succession plan (if applicable).

Get help from experts. Help forge a relationship between your heirs and your financial team, which may include a financial adviser, an estate planning attorney and an accountant. This will allow your heirs to know who to call, if things get complicated. It’ll also help to prepare them for what they’re supposed to be doing, once they get their inheritance.

Communication is the key. Talking with your experts and your heirs will make certain that everyone understands each other’s roles, regardless of whether it’s a small business or a multimillion-dollar empire.

Reference: AJC (Sep. 25, 2020) “Why Vanderbilts should inspire you to create an estate plan”

estate plan audit

Does My Estate Plan Need an Audit?

You should have an estate plan because every state has statutes that describe how your assets are managed, and who benefits if you don’t have a will. Most people want to have more say about who and how their assets are managed, so they draft estate planning documents that match their objectives.

Forbes’ recent article entitled “Auditing Your Estate Plan” says the first question is what are your estate planning objectives? Almost everyone wants to have financial security and the satisfaction of knowing how their assets will be properly managed. Therefore, these are often the most common objectives. However, some people also want to also promote the financial and personal growth of their families, provide for social and cultural objectives by giving to charity and other goals. To help you with deciding on your objectives and priorities, here are some of the most common objectives:

  • Making sure a surviving spouse or family is financially OK
  • Providing for others
  • Providing now for your children and later
  • Saving now on income taxes
  • Saving on estate and gift taxes in the future
  • Donating to charity
  • Having a trusted agency manage my assets, if I am incapacitated
  • Having money for my children’s education
  • Having retirement income; and
  • Shielding my assets from creditors.

Speak with an experienced estate planning attorney about the way in which you should handle your assets. If your plan doesn’t meet your objectives, your estate plan should be revised. This will include a review of your will, trusts, powers of attorney, healthcare proxies, beneficiary designation forms and real property titles.

Note that joint accounts, pay on death (POD) accounts, retirement accounts, life insurance policies, annuities and other assets will transfer to your heirs by the way you designate your beneficiaries on those accounts. Any assets in a trust won’t go through probate. “Irrevocable” trusts may protect assets from the claims of creditors and possibly long-term care costs, if properly drafted and funded.

Another question is what happens in the event you become mentally or physically incapacitated and who will see to your financial and medical affairs. Use a power of attorney to name a person to act as your agent in these situations.

If, after your audit, you find that your plans need to be revised, follow these steps:

  1. Work with an experienced estate planning attorney to create a plan based on your objectives
  2. Draft and execute a will and other estate planning documents customized to your plan
  3. Correctly title your assets and complete your beneficiary designations
  4. Create and fund trusts
  5. Draft and sign powers of attorney, in the event of your incapacity
  6. Draft and sign documents for ownership interest in businesses, intellectual property, artwork and real estate
  7. Discuss the consequences of implementing your plan with an experienced estate planning attorney; and
  8. Review your plan regularly.

Reference: Forbes (Sep. 23, 2020) “Auditing Your Estate Plan”

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